Ocean Blue: A dark mode friendly OBS Theme

Long story short, I got tired from having to look at white checkboxes on gray background in OBS Studio, and decided to make my own theme. I picked deep blue shades for this, as it’s a color I’m familiar with, and one of the colors that still has reasonable contrast when layered on top of another. This is what it looks like.

It’s available for Patreon and Github supporters now, and will eventually be publicly available once it’s done. The current version is 75% complete lacking only some elements, such as menus, tooltips, font picker and other similar elements. In my opinion this is much easier on the eyes than the default “Dark” theme, and I’ll most likely be using this from now on.

Fastest Uint8Array to Hex String conversion in JavaScript

As a Programmer I have to deal with a number of programming languages to write code, and one language that repeatedly appears is JavaScript. JavaScript is one of the weirder languages – similar to PHP in weirdness – which makes it an interesting experience to say the least. Most of the time you’re at the whim of a grey box compiler, due to the massive variance of Browsers and Devices that the users use.

So in order to best approach reality, I have to figure out which APIs are available at any point in time, and also run performance benchmarks in current major browsers available to me. And that’s what todays post is about, finding which of the various methods is fast enough for high performance use.

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A Review: Gainward RTX 3090 Phantom

Melted PCB

Around the end of last week, my Alphacool waterblock decided that it was time to kill the NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition it was placed on. That was the day I learned that burning PCB and plastic smells the same as coal – and that I should probably replace my smoke detectors since they didn’t go off at all.

That meant I needed a new GPU, and after a bit of search for actually available GPUs, I ended up going for the 3090 cards – nobody apparently has 3080s, only 3070s and 3090s. The card I ended up with is the Gainward RTX 3090 Phantom, which has some limitations but otherwise works well. Let’s get into the hard stuff.

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NVIDIA RTX 30xx: How to make everything else obsolete in one generation

NVIDIA certainly wasn’t idle in the last two years, that much is clear. Their jump from 12nm to 8nm should set the average standard for what we should expect from moving nodes while also improving on the generation. This generational leap is what we should have seen from the 20xx series, which now seems like overpriced junk – so sorry for anyone who bought them in the last 6 months and can’t return them. Let’s go into a bit of history and detail.

The AMD side: Shrinking 14nm to 7nm

Three years ago in 2017, AMD RTG tried to even the playing field by moving from 14nm to 7nm, and succeeded. Their new RX Vega generation, while extremely power hungry, did improve performance across the board by roughly 30-75%, depending on what you looked at. And in 2019 they improved on that, with the RX 5000 series – except this time we saw practically no (<5%) performance increase, but they did cut down on heat generation and power draw quite a lot.

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What happened to the Video Encoding Samples project?

Due to the new GPU generations being released by the two major vendors (and soon three major vendors), I’ve currently put the project on indefinite hold. The current discoveries still hold for all existing encoders, which makes newer tests unnecessary for the time being. Even the early runs have not resulted in different settings compared to before.

For the time being, I’ve left the old data online, while I quietly work on making a new, more user friendly version possible. Perhaps I will even allow user submissions in order to increase the number of tested GPUs, but that requires a lot of hosting storage.

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A preview of what’s coming with StreamFX v0.9

A lot of time has passed since the 0.8 release of StreamFX, and since then a lot of code has been submitted and tested. A ton of issues have been fixed internally, making everything work better, and a lot of new features are being worked on. Let’s take a quick look at the already confirmed additions!

The FFmpeg Encoders are now available on Linux!

You can now use the fancy NVENC UI/UX from StreamFX on your Linux machine! While zero-copy is not supported due to a limitation in OBS Studio itself, all the encoders should be available to you as long as you have the necessary system drivers. This limitation is not something I can work around, so if you need zero-copy you will have to stick with Windows, or find an alternative solution – or just learn coding and write the necessary code in OBS Studio.

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Funding StreamFX: Where to go from here?

StreamFX has grown into one of the most used plugins for OBS Studio, often being called essential for big and small creators alike. And yet, there is a massive problem facing StreamFX: A lack of funding. Like any project, StreamFX can’t survive without it, so where do we go from here?

Currently the funding come from Github Sponsors, Twitch Subscriptions, Patreon, and my own job. The first three make up around $110 in total (+- some amount), which I’m really thankful for. While $110 is not a lot, it does help a bit, and reduces my time spent at work ever so slightly.

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Is a 48kHz sample rate truly enough for Audio?

Ever since the day that we’ve been able to push sample rate higher than 44.1kHz, this question has appeared: What is the best sample rate for Audio, and can you actually hear the difference between 48kHz and 96kHz (or higher) sample rates?

Before we get into this, note that I am not an audio engineer, or a scientist. I am a software developer, who is often too curious for his own good, resulting in weird new projects – like StreamFX. So take this with a grain of salt, and if you know better, do feel free to contact me!

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