The Art of encoding with NVIDIA Turing NVENC

Dual-PC streaming with x264 has been the leader in H264 encoding for streaming for years – up until NVIDIA released their new Turing generation. This new generation of GPUs with a brand new encoder brough comparable quality to x264 medium (or better), has next to no impact on gaming (unlike an NDI-based dual-PC setup) and is much more affordable.

Let’s take a look at the necessary changes to get your NVENC encoding to look comparable to x264 medium (or better).

warning

These settings are for an older FFmpeg version!

The settings provided here are for FFmpeg 4.3.x and earlier, and OBS Studio currently ships with FFmpeg 4.2.x. FFmpeg 4.4 has different Presets and Tuning values, which by default already reach the quality described here, requiring no additional custom configuration.

Setting up NVENC (for Streaming)

With modern OBS Studio, you have two options: NVENC NVENC H.264 (new) or StreamFXs NVIDIA NVENC H264/AVC (via FFmpeg). The latter has more options to configure, but both will give you comparable quality to x264 medium – as long as you have a Turing GPU encoder. You can check here to see if your GPU has a Turing encoder – note that the GTX 1650 Super also has a Turing encoder.

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Is a 48kHz sample rate truly enough for Audio?

Ever since the day that we’ve been able to push sample rate higher than 44.1kHz, this question has appeared: What is the best sample rate for Audio, and can you actually hear the difference between 48kHz and 96kHz (or higher) sample rates?

Before we get into this, note that I am not an audio engineer, or a scientist. I am a software developer, who is often too curious for his own good, resulting in weird new projects – like StreamFX. So take this with a grain of salt, and if you know better, do feel free to contact me!

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