NVIDIA RTX 30xx: How to make everything else obsolete in one generation

NVIDIA certainly wasn’t idle in the last two years, that much is clear. Their jump from 12nm to 8nm should set the average standard for what we should expect from moving nodes while also improving on the generation. This generational leap is what we should have seen from the 20xx series, which now seems like overpriced junk – so sorry for anyone who bought them in the last 6 months and can’t return them. Let’s go into a bit of history and detail.

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What happened to the Video Encoding Samples project?

Due to the new GPU generations being released by the two major vendors (and soon three major vendors), I’ve currently put the project on indefinite hold. The current discoveries still hold for all existing encoders, which makes newer tests unnecessary for the time being. Even the early runs have not resulted in different settings compared to before.

For the time being, I’ve left the old data online, while I quietly work on making a new, more user friendly version possible. Perhaps I will even allow user submissions in order to increase the number of tested GPUs, but that requires a lot of hosting storage.

For those that have not been around for a long time, the Video Encoding Samples project is a simple database of encoding results compared to the original footage with PSNR, SSIM and VMAF. It is the project that has resulted in the ultimate NVENC settings, and also resulted in a lot of yelling at a certain vendor to finally stop dawdling around.

StreamFX v0.8.1 is now available!

In the two months since the release of Version 0.8.0, a lot of bugs have been discovered – which now have been fixed with Version 0.8.1! Let’s take a closer look at the things that have been fixed.

Update: Update 0.8.2 has been released fixing the newly discovered issues in 0.8.1. The links in the post have been updated.
Update: 0.8.3 is out, and the links have been updated.

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The Art of encoding with NVIDIA Turing NVENC

Dual-PC streaming with x264 has been the leader in H264 encoding for streaming for years – up until NVIDIA released their new Turing generation. This new generation of GPUs with a brand new encoder brough comparable quality to x264 medium (or better), has next to no impact on gaming (unlike an NDI-based dual-PC setup) and is much more affordable.

Let’s take a look at the necessary changes to get your NVENC encoding to look comparable to x264 medium (or better).

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Is a 48kHz sample rate truly enough for Audio?

Ever since the day that we’ve been able to push sample rate higher than 44.1kHz, this question has appeared: What is the best sample rate for Audio, and can you actually hear the difference between 48kHz and 96kHz (or higher) sample rates?

Update: Information for supersampling D/A and A/D converters has been added to the entry. Please see the conclusion page for more information.

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RTX Voice in my VST-compatible Audio Software? It’s more likely than you think!

If you haven’t heard of RTX Voice, it’s basically “Krisp” in Discord but with less shitty audio quality. It’s based on Tensor, which can fall back onto CUDA hardware, but runs best on RTX due to the hardware accelerated Tensor cores on it. You can find a guide on how to set it up here on Nvidias own website.

I’m currently trying to integrate it as a VST, though progress on this may be slow due to actual work, and StreamFX having priority. But once I have a working version it will be available for free for any Patreon, Github and Twitch supporter – or available for a one-time fee of 20 EUR.

I’ll make another post once it is ready.